Macroeconomic aspects of commodity aid and counterpart funds in Sub-Saharan Africa
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Macroeconomic aspects of commodity aid and counterpart funds in Sub-Saharan Africa by Reginald Herbold Green

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Published by Institute of Development Studies in Brighton, England .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Africa, Sub-Saharan

Subjects:

  • Economic assistance -- Africa, Sub-Saharan -- Congresses.,
  • Surplus agricultural commodities -- Africa, Sub-Saharan -- Congresses.,
  • Counterpart funds -- Africa, Sub-Saharan -- Congresses.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Reginald Herbold Green.
SeriesDP,, 290, Discussion Paper (University of Sussex. Institute of Development Studies) ;, 290.
ContributionsWorkshop on Commodidity Aid and Counterpart Funds (1991 : Institute of Development Studies)
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHC800 .G723 1991
The Physical Object
Paginationii, 40 p. ;
Number of Pages40
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1332427M
ISBN 100903715449
LC Control Number92214038

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Killing the dream: the political and human economy of war in Sub-Saharan Africa / by Reginald Herbold G Macroeconomic aspects of commodity aid and counterpart funds in Sub-Saharan Africa / by Reginald Herbold The IMF and stabilisation in sub-Saharan Africa: a critical review / by Reginald Herbold Green. Commodity (especially food) aid, counterpart funds from recipient sale of external aid (commodities or import support forex) and the macroeconomics of structural adjustment in sub-Sanaran Africa. Macroeconomic Aspects of Commodity Aid and Counterpart Funds in Sub-Saharan Africa (D) Through Structural Adjustment to Transformation in Sub-Saharan Africa. Reginald Herbold Green. 01 Jan Notify me. Africa to and Beyond. Philip Ndegwa. 01 Dec Paperback. unavailable. Notify me. Counterpart Funds. Reginald Herbold. R. H. Green, ‘Commodity Aid and Counterpart Funds in Sub-Saharan Africa: Macroeconomic Aspects’, Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, , p. 9. Google ScholarAuthor: Jerker Carlsson, Gunnar Köhlin, Anders Ekbom.

Degradation of rural development: development of rural degradation: change and peasants in Sub-Saharan Africa / by Reginld Herbold Green Institute of Development Studies Brighton, England Australian/Harvard Citation. Green, Reginald Herbold. Macroeconomic Aspects of Commodity Aid and Counterpart Funds in Sub-Saharan Africa (D) - IDS Discussion Paper S. (Paperback) Reginald Herbold Green £ Paperback. Macroeconomic Aspects of Commodity Aid and Counterpart Funds in Sub-Saharan Africa 1 January Working Paper Commodity Aid and Counterpart Funds in Africa The paper reports on a workshop on commodity aid and counterpart funds in Africa, held at IDS, Sussex, in January Counterpart funds are local currency obtained from the sale of. The IMF and Aid to Sub-Saharan Africa. Its main findings: PRGFmacroeconomic policies have accommodated the use of incremental aid in countries whose recent policies have led to high stocks of reserves and low inflation; in other countries additional aid was programmed to be saved to increase reserves or to retire domestic debt.

'Commodity aid and counterpart funds in SSA: some macroeconomic aspects', in 'Counterpart Funds and Development', IDS Bulletin Vol 23 No 2, April 'A pobreza, o sector familiare e a terra', National Planning Directorate, Mozambique/, December 'Towards livelihoods, services and infrastructure: the struggle to. ECONOMIC CONDITIONS Giri, Jacques. Rompre avec un demi-siecle d'anti-deVeloppemenL Politique africaine (Paris), 42,, p; English, French resumes (p). ECONOMIC DEPENDENCE; ECONOMIC CONDITIONS Green, Reginald Herbold, Commodity aid and counterpart funds in sub-Saharan Africa: some macroeconomic aspects. Economic conditions in sub-Saharan Africa have remained generally robust despite a sluggish global economy. The near-term outlook for the region remains broadly positive, and growth is projected at 51/4 percent a year in Most low-income countries are projected to continue to grow strongly, supported by domestic demand, including from investment. The book then looks at inclusive growth policies to address inequality in commodity-exporting countries, particularly natural resource rich countries. Perspectives from the Middle East and North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa, emerging Asia, and Mexico are presented and, finally, the role of the international donor community is examined.