Demonstration on the bacteriological diagnosis of anthrax
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Demonstration on the bacteriological diagnosis of anthrax by R. F. C. Leith

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Published by s.n. in [S.l .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Anthrax.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Caption title.

Statementby R.F.C. Leith.
The Physical Object
Pagination11p. ;
Number of Pages11
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18686218M

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1. Author(s): Leith,R F C Title(s): Demonstration on the bacteriological diagnosis of anthrax/ by R.F.C. Leith. Country of Publication: England Publisher: [S.l.: s.n.   Multiple subcutaneous haemorrhages and serous effusions into the pleura, peritoneum and pericardium are also common features. DIAGNOSIS Bacteriological methods are required not only to diagnose anthrax in man and animals, but also to detect the presence of the bacilli or spores in suspected material, such as shaving brushes, wool, hair, etc. Pasteur's attempts at immunization in the field were aimed at protecting sheep against this disease. Bacteriological methods are required not only to diagnose anthrax in man and animals, but also to detect the presence of the bacilli in suspected material, such as shaving brushes, wool, and hair. About the Book. In April of the city of Sverdlovsk in Russia's Ural Mountains was struck by a frightening anthrax epidemic. Official Soviet documents reported sixty-four human deaths resulting from the ingestion of tainted meat sold on the black market, but U.S. intelligence sources implied a different story, and the lack of documentation left unresolved questions.

Anthrax is thought to have originated in Egypt and Mesopotamia. Many scholars think that in Moses’ time, during the 10 plagues of Egypt, anthrax may have caused what was known as the fifth plague, described as a sickness affecting horses, cattle, sheep, camels and oxen. One of the important names in the history of bacteriology is that of Koch, a German doctor. His first important investigation was into the cause of anthrax, a primary disease of cattle and sheep, which sometimes infects man. Koch continued to make important bacteriological discoveries. He introduced the use of dyes to color bacteria. Mixed infections. It was an early observation (Eurich & Hewlett, , cite four publications between and ) that simultaneous injection of other organisms, such as staphylococci, B. coli, B. typhosus and cowpox vaccine, delayed or prevented death from anthrax in guinea-pigs, mice or apparently suggested that the mutual antagonism of anthrax bacilli and cowpox. The bacteria Bacillus anthracis causes anthrax. The bacteria is a small aerobic or facultatively-anaerobic, gram-positive or gram-variable, encapsulated, spore-forming rod. The organism produces toxins which are important for clinical virulence. It grows well on blood agar resulting in large, irregular-shaped colonies. The origin of the name comes from the Greek word "anthrakis," meaning black.

The absence of a 'bacteriological revolution' in venereal disease (VD) diagnosis in late nineteenth-century Britain has most commonly been demonstrated through medical texts and hospital practice. Anthrax is an acute infectious disease caused by the spore-forming bacterium Bacillus anthracis (B. anthracis). B. anthracis spores are highly infective and can cause inhalation, cutaneous, or gastrointestinal anthrax. Inhalation anthrax results from breathing in spores and is of great concern due to its high fatality rate.   Intestinal anthrax is a difficult diagnosis that must be distinguished from dysentery. Dysentery may manifest as bloody diarrhea, as does intestinal anthrax, and may be accompanied by abdominal pain (eg, in cases of Shigella or amebic dysentery). A history of ingesting meat possibly contaminated with anthrax is helpful in suspected cases of. De Vos V, Bryden HB. Anthrax in the Kruger National Park: the role of roan (Hippotragus equinus) and sable () in the epidemiology of anthrax; Proceedings of the ARC–Onderstepoort international congress on anthrax, brucellosis, CBPP, clostridial and mycobacterial diseases; Berg-en Dal, Kruger National Park, South Africa. August ; pp. 33–